Androgel/Low Testosterone Drugs

If you have used testosterone therapy or so-called “Low T” medications or gels and have suffered a stroke, pulmonary embolism (blood clot in your lungs), DVT (deep vein thrombosis, a blood clot in your veins), or a heart attack, you may have a lawsuit. Our law firm is investigating potential claims for men who have suffered serious cardiovascular events while using prescription testosterone medications.

AndroGel testosterone gel is a topical testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) manufactured by AbbVie, Inc. and formerly Unimed Pharmaceuticals of Abbott Laboratories, Inc. AndroGel is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat men with low testosterone or “Low T," associated with a diagnosed medical condition. AndroGel 1% and AndroGel 1.62%, are both applied topically to the skin. Patients apply it directly to their upper arm and shoulder and it is absorbed through the skin to deliver testosterone to the patient for approximately 24 hours. The drug has been heavily prescribed over the past several years as a safe way to treat men with low testosterone. However, numerous recent studies suggest that men taking AndroGel have a far greater risk of suffering a heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, or other adverse cardiovascular problem. The most recent study, known as the PLOS ONE study, performed on January 29, 2014, found that men 65 years and older who took testosterone injections or used the gel, had double the risk of a heart attack in the months after starting the treatment. On Jan. 31, 2014, after reviewing these studies, the FDA announced it would be investigating the risks of heart attack, stroke and death in men using prescription testosterone products.

Suthers Law Firm is currently investing claims on behalf of individuals who used AndroGel or other testosterone therapies and suffered heart attacks, strokes or other serious medical complications. In addition to AndroGel, Suthers Law Firm is investigating potential lawsuits in connection with the use of the following products:

  • AndroDerm: A testosterone patch introduced in 1995 by Actavis, formerly Watson Pharmaceuticals, which is worn on the skin;

  • Axiron: A testosterone gel introduced by Eli Lilly in 2010, which is applied to the armpits in a manner similar to deodorant;

  • Bio-T Gel: A once-daily testosterone treatment gel approved in February 2012, produced by Teva Pharmaceuticals;

  • Delatestryl: A testosterone injection treatment introduced by Endo Pharmaceuticals in 2008, which is injected into the buttock muscle usually every 1 to 4 weeks;

  • Depo-Testosterone: Injection testosterone replacement therapy that was introduced in 2006, produced by Pharmacia and Upjohn Company;

  • Foresta: A testosterone spray gel that is applied to the thigh daily, which was introduced by Endo Pharmaceuticals in December 2010;

  • Striant: A testosterone supplement sold by Auxilium that adheres to the gums and is placed twice daily;

  • Testim: A gel treatment for testosterone replacement that is applied to the shoulders daily. It was introduced in 2002 by Auxilium and is widely used;

  • Testopel: A testosterone pellet that was first introduced in 1972 and is also sold by Auxilium. The testosterone implant is placed under the skin, releasing testosterone over a period of 3 to 6 months.

If you or loved one has experienced a heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, or other adverse cardiovascular problem after using one of the products listed above, contact the experienced product liability attorneys at Suthers Law Firm online or call us on our toll free number, 1-800-320-2384, to set up a FREE consultation.